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Pandemic has forced women in the restaurant industry to re-evaluate the value of their work, study finds

Economists are calling the devastating and long-term impacts on women in the restaurant industry – financial and otherwise – as “Cession-elle.”Photo: Mémento Média

In a series of studies last year, economists documented the effects of the coronavirus pandemic and its financial fallout on women, especially in service occupations.

In inventorying the damage, they adopted the term “She-Cession” to describe the devastating and long-term impacts on women in the restaurant industry – financial and otherwise.

“We have seen long-term analyzes that show that women do certain jobs at a higher rate than men,” says Belinda Román, professor of economics at St. Mary’s University in San Antonio, mentioning the hospitality industry. , education and nursing, in addition to the fact that women are often the primary caregivers.

“Sadly, the pandemic has bubbled it to the fore,” she says. “Because this economic change was different from what we experienced, say, during the financial crisis (2007-2009), which affected men more than women. “

A May report from advocacy group One Fair Wage and UC Berkeley’s Food Work Research Center postulates that the restaurant industry, which is one of the largest employers of women and wage workers below the national minimum wage, plays a central role in perpetuating inequalities between women, especially women of color and working mothers.

The only fair wage A report surveyed more than 4,800 food service workers from October 20, 2020 to May 1, 2021 and found that more than 75% were considering leaving their jobs because of “low wages and tips.”

The “COVID health risks” were the second most common.

Reflecting the demographics of tip service workers, the majority (74%) of survey respondents were women. However, conditions are more severe for working mothers, according to the study. Nationally, working mothers reported contracting COVID-19 at higher rates than all other workers – 26% versus 19%.

Additionally, 70% of working mothers reported experiencing or witnessing hostile behavior from guests in direct response to their application of COVID-19 safety protocols.

Indeed, since Ohio restaurants were widely allowed to reopen, workers have been forced to become de facto health attendants, trying to enforce mask and social distancing protocols in what the Centers for Disease Control have called it one of the most dangerous environments in the pandemic.

During the state’s COVID-19 lockdown, officers from the Ohio Investigation Unit issued 613 citations related to pandemic health rules to 345 different companies across the state.

And a 2020 One Fair Wage study reported that restaurant workers were to experience “masked harassment,” a phenomenon in which restaurant patrons asked a waiter to remove their masks to assess how much they should be tipped – which , if they did, put them at an increased risk of contracting the virus.

Experts say these conditions have exacerbated pre-existing problems such as low hourly wages, sexual harassment, lack of health insurance and long working hours. The workers themselves say it’s not hard to see why so many people choose to leave.

“If you have access to a phone and you’re on social media, there’s no excuse not knowing how bad it can be,” said Alexandra Davalos, an office worker turned server interviewed by CityBeat sister paper the San Antonio Current. “But people who have never worked in the industry are somehow unaware of the emotional and physical burden it can take on a person. Hotel life is historically not a sustainable life for everyone, and people are fed up with the way it used to be.

A June 2021 report from the Ohio Restaurant Association (ORA) found that 65% of restaurant owners said staffing was a critical issue for them and 26% said finding workers was one of their top three concerns. ” most urgent “.

“This problem continues to force restaurants to limit hours, close on certain days and limit the capacity of customers,” says ORA.

And, according to the report, many restaurant owners believed the weekly $ 300 federal unemployment supplement was to blame for the shortage.

Which is what Román thinks was a factor employers weren’t counting on as they struggled to emerge from the pandemic crisis: the realization by women workers of their own worth.

“They never had time to stop and say, ‘Wait a minute. $ 7.50 an hour? I’m worth more than that, and my family needs more than that, ”she says. “To date, most have had the chance to step back and reassess. Imagine if we equalized the wages of women and everyone was a full partner in this economy. Imagine what this could do for our community. It’s just really hard to sell this idea because people tend to think, “Your gain is my loss. And it doesn’t have to be like that.

A version of this story was originally published by CityBeat’s sister newspaper, the San Antonio Current.

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The pandemic has forced women in the restaurant industry to reassess how they value their work | Flavor | San Antonio

Click to enlarge

  • Unsplash / Spencer Davis
  • According to a new report, more than 75% of restaurant workers surveyed were considering quitting their jobs because of “low wages and tips.”

In a series of studies last year, economists documented the effects of the coronavirus pandemic and its financial fallout on women, especially in service occupations.

In inventorying the damage, they adopted the term “She-Cession” to describe the devastating and long-term impacts on women in the restaurant industry – financial and otherwise. Local experts say the divestiture has been particularly felt in San Antonio, whose economy is heavily dependent on service sector jobs.

“We’ve seen long-term analyzes that show women do certain jobs at a higher rate than men… especially in places like San Antonio, where you have a lot of Hispanic women working in the hospitality industry, l education, nursing, but they have children. They are the caregivers above all else, ”said Belinda Román, professor of economics at St. Mary’s University.

“Unfortunately, the pandemic has caused it to bubble to the fore,” she added. “Because this economic change has been different from the change we have seen, say, during the [2007-2009] financial crisis, which has affected more men than women.

A May report by advocacy group One Fair Wage and the UC Berkeley Food Labor Research Center postulates that the restaurant industry, which is one of the largest employers of women and workers at lower wages nationally, plays a central role in perpetuating inequalities among women, especially women. of color and working mothers.

“I’ve always been able to get by, but in this industry, the idea of ​​having a ‘living wage’, or putting any amount of money in savings for my kids, is a goddamn chimera, ”said Teresa, a 14-year veteran in the bar and restaurant industry. She used a pseudonym for fear of reprisal in the workplace.

“Hearing that people are pushing for this right now is good, but if I quit because my boss doesn’t give me $ 15 an hour, my place will be taken by a 21 year old girl from here.” a few days, ”added Teresa, a mother of school-aged twins. “It’s just like that.”


“Low wages and tips”

The One Fair Wage report surveyed more than 4,800 restaurant workers from October 20, 2020 to May 1, 2021, and found that more than 75% were considering leaving their jobs because of “low wages and tips.” The “COVID health risks” were the second most common.

Reflecting the demographics of tip service workers, the majority (74%) of survey respondents were women. However, conditions are more severe for working mothers, according to the study. Nationally, working mothers reported contracting COVID-19 at higher rates than all other workers – 26% versus 19%.

Additionally, 70% of working mothers reported experiencing or witnessing hostile behavior from guests in direct response to their application of COVID-19 safety protocols.

Health Commissioners

Indeed, since Texas restaurants were widely allowed to reopen, workers have been forced to become de facto health attendants, trying to enforce mask and social distancing protocols in what the Centers for Disease Control have called it one of the most dangerous environments in the pandemic.

Experts say these conditions have exacerbated pre-existing problems such as low hourly wages, sexual harassment, lack of health insurance and long working hours. The workers themselves say it’s not hard to see why so many people choose to leave.

“If you have access to a phone and are on social media, there is no excuse not to know how serious this can be,” said Alexandra Davalos, an employee of the city center of SA became a county employee.

“But people who have never worked in the industry are somehow unaware of the emotional and physical burden it can take on a person. Hotel life is historically not a sustainable life for everyone, and people are fed up with the way it once was.

However, Román said there was one factor employers did not count on as they struggled to emerge from the pandemic crisis: the realization by women workers of their own worth.

“They never had time to stop and say, ‘Wait a minute. $ 7.50 an hour? I’m worth more than that, and my family needs more than that, ”she said. “To date, most have had the chance to step back and reassess. Imagine if we equalized the wages of women and everyone was a full partner in this economy. Imagine what this could do for our community. It’s just really hard to sell this idea because people tend to think, “Your gain is my loss. And it doesn’t have to be like that.

So many restaurants, so little time. Discover the latest culinary news from San Antonio with our Flavor Friday newsletter.


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Study: Pandemic has forced women in the restaurant industry to re-evaluate how they value their work

  • Unsplash / Spencer Davis
  • According to a new report, more than 75% of restaurant workers surveyed were considering quitting their jobs because of “low wages and tips.”

In a series of studies last year, economists documented the effects of the coronavirus pandemic and its financial fallout on women, especially in service occupations.

In inventorying the damage, they adopted the term “She-Cession” to describe the devastating and long-term impacts on women in the restaurant industry – financial and otherwise. Local experts say the divestiture has been particularly felt in San Antonio, whose economy is heavily dependent on service sector jobs.

“We’ve seen long-term analyzes that show women do certain jobs at a higher rate than men… especially in places like San Antonio, where you have a lot of Hispanic women working in the hospitality industry, the education, nursing, but they have children. They are the caregivers above all else, ”said Belinda Román, professor of economics at St. Mary’s University.

“Unfortunately, the pandemic has caused it to bubble to the fore,” she added. “Because this economic change has been different from the change we have seen, say, during the [2007-2009] financial crisis, which has affected more men than women.

A May report by advocacy group One Fair Wage and the UC Berkeley Food Labor Research Center postulates that the restaurant industry, which is one of the largest employers of women and workers at lower wages nationally, plays a central role in perpetuating inequalities among women, especially women. of color and working mothers.

“I’ve always been able to get by, but in this industry the idea of ​​having a ‘living wage’, or putting a lot of money into savings for my kids, is a fucking pipe dream. “said Teresa, a 14 year veteran in the bar and restaurant industry. She used a pseudonym for fear of reprisal in the workplace.

“To hear that people are pushing for this right now is good, but if I quit because my boss doesn’t give me $ 15 an hour, my place will be taken by a 21 year old girl in a few days. Added Teresa, a mother of school-aged twins. “It’s just like that.”

“Low wages and tips”

The One Fair Wage report surveyed more than 4,800 food service workers from October 20, 2020 to May 1, 2021, and found that more than 75% were considering leaving their jobs because of “low wages and tips.” The “COVID health risks” were the second most common.

Reflecting the demographics of tip service workers, the majority (74%) of survey respondents were women. However, conditions are more severe for working mothers, according to the study. Nationally, working mothers reported contracting COVID-19 at higher rates than all other workers – 26% versus 19%.

Additionally, 70% of working mothers reported experiencing or witnessing hostile behavior from guests in direct response to their application of COVID-19 safety protocols.

Health Commissioners

Indeed, since Ohio restaurants were widely allowed to reopen, workers have been forced to become de facto health attendants, trying to enforce mask and social distancing protocols in what the Centers for Disease Control have called it one of the most dangerous environments in the pandemic.

Experts say these conditions have exacerbated pre-existing problems such as low hourly wages, sexual harassment, lack of health insurance and long working hours. The workers themselves say it’s not hard to see why so many people choose to leave.

“If you have access to a phone and are on social media, there is no excuse not to know how serious this can be,” said Alexandra Davalos, an employee of downtown SA. became a county employee.

“But people who have never worked in the industry are somehow unaware of the emotional and physical burden it can take on a person. Hotel life is historically not a sustainable life for everyone, and people are fed up with the way it once was.

However, Román said there was one factor employers did not count on as they struggled to emerge from the pandemic crisis: the realization by women workers of their own worth.

“They never had time to stop and say, ‘Wait a minute. $ 7.50 an hour? I’m worth more than that, and my family needs more than that, ”she said. “To date, most have had the chance to step back and reassess. Imagine if we equalized the wages of women and everyone was a full partner in this economy. Imagine what this could do for our community. It’s just really hard to sell this idea because people tend to think, “Your gain is my loss. And it doesn’t have to be that way.


Source link

The pandemic has forced women in the restaurant industry to reassess how they value their work

Click to enlarge

  • Unsplash / Spencer Davis
  • According to a new report, more than 75% of restaurant workers surveyed were considering quitting their jobs because of “low wages and tips.”

In a series of studies last year, economists documented the effects of the coronavirus pandemic and its financial fallout on women, especially in service occupations.

In inventorying the damage, they adopted the term “She-Cession” to describe the devastating and long-term impacts on women in the restaurant industry – financial and otherwise. Local experts say the divestiture has been particularly felt in San Antonio, whose economy is heavily dependent on service sector jobs.

“We’ve seen long-term analyzes that show women do certain jobs at a higher rate than men… especially in places like San Antonio, where you have a lot of Hispanic women working in the hospitality industry, the education, nursing, but they have children. They are the caregivers above all else, ”said Belinda Román, professor of economics at St. Mary’s University.

“Unfortunately, the pandemic has caused it to bubble to the fore,” she added. “Because this economic change has been different from the change we have seen, say, during the [2007-2009] financial crisis, which has affected more men than women.

A May report by advocacy group One Fair Wage and the UC Berkeley Food Labor Research Center postulates that the restaurant industry, which is one of the largest employers of women and workers at lower wages nationally, plays a central role in perpetuating inequalities among women, especially women. of color and working mothers.

“I’ve always been able to get by, but in this industry the idea of ​​having a ‘living wage’, or putting a lot of money into savings for my kids, is a fucking pipe dream. “said Teresa, a 14 year veteran in the bar and restaurant industry. She used a pseudonym for fear of reprisal in the workplace.

“To hear that people are pushing for this right now is good, but if I quit because my boss doesn’t give me $ 15 an hour, my place will be taken by a 21 year old girl in a few days. Added Teresa, a mother of school-aged twins. “It’s just like that.”


“Low wages and tips”

The One Fair Wage report surveyed more than 4,800 food service workers from October 20, 2020 to May 1, 2021, and found that more than 75% were considering leaving their jobs because of “low wages and tips.” The “COVID health risks” were the second most common.

Reflecting the demographics of tip service workers, the majority (74%) of survey respondents were women. However, conditions are more severe for working mothers, according to the study. Nationally, working mothers reported contracting COVID-19 at higher rates than all other workers – 26% versus 19%.

Additionally, 70% of working mothers reported experiencing or witnessing hostile behavior from guests in direct response to their application of COVID-19 safety protocols.

Health Commissioners

Indeed, since Texas restaurants were widely allowed to reopen, workers have been forced to become de facto health attendants, trying to enforce mask and social distancing protocols in what the Centers for Disease Control have called it one of the most dangerous environments in the pandemic.

Experts say these conditions have exacerbated pre-existing problems such as low hourly wages, sexual harassment, lack of health insurance and long working hours. The workers themselves say it’s not hard to see why so many people choose to leave.

“If you have access to a phone and are on social media, there is no excuse not to know how serious this can be,” said Alexandra Davalos, an employee of downtown SA. became a county employee.

“But people who have never worked in the industry are somehow unaware of the emotional and physical burden it can take on a person. Hotel life is historically not a sustainable life for everyone, and people are fed up with the way it once was.

However, Román said there was one factor employers did not count on as they struggled to emerge from the pandemic crisis: the realization by women workers of their own worth.

“They never had time to stop and say, ‘Wait a minute. $ 7.50 an hour? I’m worth more than that, and my family needs more than that, ”she said. “To date, most have had the chance to step back and reassess. Imagine if we equalized the wages of women and everyone was a full partner in this economy. Imagine what this could do for our community. It’s just really hard to sell this idea because people tend to think, “Your gain is my loss. And it doesn’t have to be that way.

So many restaurants, so little time. Discover the latest culinary news from San Antonio with our Flavor Friday newsletter.


Source link

What the restaurant industry can learn from Amazon | Operations

James Shea, director of content strategy at Zuppler, explains why restaurant and food service operators should take a close look at Amazon’s model and how it has perfected a user experience around a frictionless transaction.

The restaurant industry can learn a lot from Amazon. The e-commerce platform has been processing online orders since 1994, more than a decade before the online platforms GrubHub and Seamless were established. Since then, Amazon has grown from a small online bookseller to the world’s most valuable retailer.

Amazon has created a user experience around a frictionless transaction. The company strives to move the customer forward throughout the sales journey and reduce the risk that a customer will not complete the transaction, which the restaurant industry should keep in mind. According to a survey, 55% of food and drink orders are never completed after adding an item to a cart. This can adversely affect a restaurant’s bottom line.

Keep customers at the center

When Jeff Bezos founded Amazon, he always put customers at the center of every decision. He knew that if customers had positive experiences, they would continue to order from Amazon.

Bezos has always kept an open line of communication with customers. He let customers send comments to his personal email address and spent time going through the comments. When Bezos identified an issue based on a customer complaint, he wanted it resolved quickly. He forwarded an email with the complaint and only said “?” This meant that an employee had to quickly find an answer to the problem.

Bezos believed in monitoring the data and tracking the numbers, but he also understood that people are the direct recipients of the product. He wanted to make sure that customers were always happy with the experience.

Restaurants need to put the customer experience at the center of building an online platform. A restaurant must make decisions based on what is best for the customer.

Personalized recommendations

Recommendations are one of Amazon’s best features. Amazon uses a customer’s order and search history and makes recommendations. It also associates products, notifying a customer that when someone has purchased a certain item, the person has also purchased a different item. The goal is not only to help the customer with their purchases, but also to encourage the person to add more items to the cart.

This technique is rarely used in an online restaurant ordering experience, but often occurs in person. A person can order a steak and the waiter suggests a particular type of wine. With online shopping, restaurants should make suggestions for selling an order, just like Amazon has been doing for years.

Articles are easy to find

The user experience at Amazon is built around research. Amazon’s user interface isn’t cluttered with frivolous amounts of information. Amazon wants to make it easy for the customer to find and buy items. Items are organized into different categories, but users can also use a search function to find specific items.

It is the same for a restaurant. The purpose of a restaurant’s website is to sell food. This means that it is easier to find and buy items. Online menus should be searchable and menu items should be categorized in an easy-to-understand manner.

Membership program

In 2005, Amazon launched Amazon Prime. For $ 79 per year, members received free two-day shipping on orders. Over the years, the benefits of Amazon Prime have increased. Members now have access to Amazon’s streaming service and Amazon’s music, but the price has only increased slightly.

Loyalty programs are a big part of the restaurant industry, but membership hasn’t historically been. Membership fees attract and reward a restaurant’s most loyal customers. A customer gains benefits by becoming a member and turns into a dedicated customer.

Frictionless control

Amazon makes ordering simple and frictionless. The system records a person’s credit card and mailing address. A customer clicks on the item, adds it to the basket and in a few clicks the orders are processed. A regular customer does not need to enter a credit card and contact information.

Restaurants can make the payment process easier. Many restaurants do not record credit cards and customer contact information, and the customer must re-enter the information. This creates more friction and increases the chances of the customer abandoning the order.

Easy return policy

Amazon wants to make sure every customer is happy with their order. If there are any issues, the company makes returning an item effortless. Amazon works with Kohl’s and other retailers, so customers don’t have to pay for shipping costs. Amazon is not asking about the return. He finds a way to satisfy the customer.

In a restaurant, takeout and delivery orders are more often wrong than in-person orders. A restaurant has to work extremely hard to correct the problem and make the customer happy. The restaurant cannot make excuses for the problem but has to work hard to fix the problem, just like Amazon.

James Shea is Director of Content Strategy at Zuppler


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“Papa” Doug Manchester Could Return To San Diego’s Restaurant Industry With Opening Of Papas On Prospect

August 17, 2021

Public records indicate that San Diego businessman “Papa” Doug Manchester is set to return to the La Jolla space where he last operated the Bijou bar and restaurant for the opening of a new concept called Papas On Prospect.

Doug Manchester’s Manchester Financial Group is in the process of transferring the liquor license at 1205 Prospect Street, Unit 100D, La Jolla, to a new catering company called Papas On Prospect. Manchester had previously operated two restaurants in this space – first an offshoot of Grand Del Mar’s Amaya in 2013 before converting it into a French bistro concept Bijou in June 2014. Bijou abruptly closed in spring 2015 and the central space de La Jolla lay dormant for a few years before becoming Covo La Jolla, a Mediterranean restaurant from longtime restaurateur and industry insider Michael Viscuso. Covo finished its run in March 2019 and the 10,000 square foot space has not been occupied since.

Doug Manchester is a controversial San Diego real estate mogul and businessman who has developed numerous properties in the area. Notably, he previously owned the San Diego Union Tribune and built The Grand Del Mar complex, which he has since sold. In 2017, then-President Trump appointed Manchester United States ambassador to the Bahamas, where he owns a house, but the appointment was not accepted by the Senate.


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Pokeworks Appoints Restaurant Industry Veteran Steve Heeley As CEO

IRVINE, Calif., August 12, 2021 / PRNewswire / – To strengthen its growth strategy and strengthen the brand, Pokéworks announces the promotion of Chief Marketing Officer Steve heeley to the Chief Executive Officer, with immediate effect. Heeley’s appointment comes at a pivotal moment for the brand as it rolls out a new restaurant design and development projects, menu innovations and great additions to the C-Suite, fueling the franchise’s rapid development as the brand is on track to add 10 locations by the end of 2021.

Heeley joined the Pokeworks team as CMO in March 2021 with extensive experience in brand management, menu creation and restaurant development focused on health. Prior to joining the Pokeworks team, Heeley served as CEO at Veggie Grill, where he led the plant-based and rapid concept growth through rebranding, new menu development and digital transformation. His list of past leadership positions held in the industry includes Earl of Sandwich, Au Bon Pain, The Coffee Bean Tea Leaf and Beja fresh. In his role as CMO of Pokeworks, Heeley oversaw the marketing department while leading efforts surrounding revenue strategy, including branding and digital strategy, product development and customer relationship management. As CEO, Heeley will work with passion to build the brand, team and systems to support the success of all franchise operators.

“It has been exciting and humbling to be a part of the tremendous growth of this brand,” said Heeley. “The founders, management team and franchise partners of Pokeworks have done an incredible job of making Pokeworks a nationally successful brand in a short period of time. I am delighted to build on this foundation and help build guiding Pokeworks into the future with our shared vision to become the world’s most trusted, fast, premium casual poke brand. Poke is no longer a trend, it has become a widely accepted growth category in the industry. fast casual. “

The brand’s performance over the past few years has garnered it numerous awards, including being named one of NRN’s top five concepts in 2018, inclusion in Fast Casual’s Top 100 Movers and Shakers three years in a row, including the ranking among the top five brands. for 2019 and 2020, and inclusion in Entrepreneur’s Franchise 500 ranking in 2021. Pokeworks has set ambitious expansion targets to double new store commitments in 2021 and 2022 as it seeks multi-unit operators throughout United States and internationally.

“Pokeworks is an ever-evolving restaurant, evolving to meet consumer needs for high-quality, high-quality, quick casual options that are differentiated,” said Mike Chen, president and co-founder of Pokeworks. “Under Steve’s leadership, Pokeworks is and will continue to be a consumer-centric brand. With Steve’s experience as CEO and his commitment to making Pokeworks the most trusted premium poke brand, we have no doubt that ‘it will lead us to future success as we continue to innovate, adapt and grow with world-class franchise partners. ”

Within the framework of the relocations of the executive, Mike wu, former CEO and co-founder of Pokeworks, will assume the role of culinary manager. In this role, he will focus his efforts on menu ideation and culture, which has been his passion since starting his job at Pokeworks in 2015.

“This announcement is a strategic part of the evolution of our business,” Wu said. “There are some exciting times ahead, and I know Steve is looking forward to working with everyone at Pokeworks to help write the crucial next chapters in our history. “

As the nation’s largest poke brand, Pokeworks has led the growth of the premium poke industry, known for its fresh and flavorful traditional Hawaiian-inspired poke. The brand is known for its Signature Works poke creations as well as its “Poke-Your-Way” option allowing customers to create their own poke bowls, burritos or salads by selecting a basic protein – tuna, salmon, chicken, shrimp. and tofu, unique regional blends, flavoring sauces, toppings and crunchy texture.

ABOUT POKEWORKS:
Pokeworks is one of the largest and fastest growing poke brands in the country in North America with over 60 open locations and over 75 are slated to open by the end of 2022. The brand offers a fresh take on Hawaiian-inspired burritos, bowls and poke salads derived from the highest quality ingredients. The brand’s unique menu allows for complete customization to suit almost anyone, including those on gluten-free, nut-free, vegetarian, vegan, as well as cooked or raw protein diets. For more information on Pokeworks franchise opportunities, visit https://www.pokeworks.com/franchise.

Contact: Anna Pool, Fishman PR, 847-945-1300, [email protected]

SOURCE Pokeworks

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http://www.pokeworks.com


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With details still pending, the restaurant industry accepts the city’s new vaccination mandate to avoid another shutdown

Mayor Bill de Blasio’s sweeping new mandate requiring patrons to show proof of vaccination before dining inside has been widely greeted as a carrot rather than a stick by the restaurant industry.

After resisting 17 months of downtime and varying masking and contact tracing requirements, many restaurateurs expressed relief that they could continue to eat indoors even though there are exemptions and unanswered questions.

“Will there be awkward interactions? I’m sure there will be, ”said Michael Fuquay, co-owner of Queensboro in Jackson Heights. But he explained that a government warrant means he can deviate, telling a client, “I haven’t decided we need to check your vaccine, we’ve been told we need to check your vaccine.”

The NYC Hospitality Alliance also adopted the new vaccine requirement, considered the country’s first, while acknowledging that it would pose new hurdles for its more than 4,000 paying members in the restaurant and nightlife industries. The organization says the city has more than 24,000 catering establishments, employing more than a quarter of a million people.

“We know that a mandatory vaccine requirement will pose economic and operational challenges for restaurants, especially in communities where vaccination rates and hesitation are lower,” said Andrew Rigie, executive director of the NYC Hospitality Alliance. “However, it will also ease the burden that restaurants and bars face when voluntarily implementing this policy.”

Industry acceptance of the mandate comes as the delta variant of the coronavirus increases in New York City and across the country. Business groups say requiring proof of vaccination is better than alternatives. The Five-Borough Chamber Alliance called the mayor’s move “a necessary step for businesses to continue to serve their customers safely and to prevent more drastic restrictions and closures that would once again cripple the economy.”

As of August 16, proof of at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine must be presented before entering a bar, restaurant, indoor performance space or gym. The performance will begin on September 13. Customers can present a paper vaccination card from the CDC or share their vaccination status on an app, such as the state’s Excelsior pass or the city’s new COVID Safe app, though at least one reviewer has pointed out the app’s inability to verify a person’s immunization status.

Jonathan Forgash, executive director of the Queens Together group, said its members “will continue to work with elected officials and municipal agencies to educate and inform our restaurants on best practices and compliance.”

Some opponents of mandatory vaccines have said the plan goes too far. Councilor Joe Borelli tweeted his opposition to the policy on the same day as the Daily News published its editorial saying that vaccination warrants create “two classes of New Yorkers.”

Some scheduled a gathering at the town hall. Others encouraged legal action.

Anita Trehan of the Chaiwali restaurant in Harlem said she supported the mandate as a way to encourage more New Yorkers to get vaccinated. But she acknowledged that some customers might not be happy. “We’re going to have to find an internal situation where we verify their information and we’ll just have to train our staff to be very polite at all times but pushy,” she said.

It’s a delicate balance, but some have said it’s not so unheard of after dealing with other pandemic-era mandates, like wearing masks and tracing contact.

“I’m going to adopt the same mindset as if we step out of cheesecake,” said Ashwin Deshmukh, owner of Bowery Short Stories restaurant. “I’ll probably suggest something else.

Restaurants could encourage customers without proof of vaccination to sit outside if they have space. But Deshmukh said he didn’t want to divide his customers into different zones and could politely encourage them to have their meals in local parks.

The mayor did not specify how businesses are expected to cope with these and other situations. On CBS This Morning, he said children under 12, who are too young to be vaccinated, can eat indoors with their parents and can wear masks.

But Fuquay wondered about bathroom policy.

“We are legally required to have bathrooms available to guests,” he explained. “It seems obvious to me that people who are not vaccinated but who dine out will have to be allowed to enter the space in order to use the toilet and access the hand washing, but we will obviously want some clarification on this. . “

Others want clarification on how to treat clients with religious or other exemptions from vaccines.

Dr Rachael Piltch-Loeb, a public health emergency preparedness expert affiliated with both the NYU School of Global Public Health and Harvard’s TH Chan School of Public Health, said eating inside a restaurant, especially in a restaurant with limited traffic, carries a risk. But she also said: “Having a group of vaccinated people dining together indoors means less virus transmission is likely to occur even if someone is infected.”

An unvaccinated person who uses the toilet “will likely be the exception rather than the rule, so the risk they pose to a room of fully vaccinated people is non-zero but is mitigated with these policies.”

Companies also want information about the application and the new fines. Jeffrey Bank, CEO of Alicart Restaurant Group, owner of Virgil’s and Carmine’s, said he was disappointed when the tenure was announced, “the mayor’s next words were mostly about inspections and enforcement.”

The mayor said the health ministry would be responsible for enforcing the law and the agency said “housing is“ an integral part of any public health approach. ”The DOH also said that before August 16, he “will receive more comments, finalize the policy, publish it and start implementing it.”

“Then we’ll spend almost a month educating people, going to businesses, getting calls from businesses, answering questions and concerns, making sure everyone understands the new approach. And then, on September 13, during this week, we will begin inspections and enforcement. So we want to give businesses, large and small, a chance to acclimatize. “

Carmine’s location in Times Square is slated to reopen on September 14, a day after enforcement of the new vaccine mandate began. Bank said de Blasio should use his bully chair to seek more federal support because nearly 300,000 additional restaurants have applied for federal aid that the new restoration program could fund.

The vaccination mandate is much more preferable to the restaurant industry than requiring a return to mask wear. “The masks were a terrible symbol of turning back the clock,” said Kathryn Wylde, president and CEO of the New York City Partnership, which advocates for the city’s business community.

She also acknowledged that the warrant is a way to encourage New Yorkers to get vaccinated, which will further reopen the economy. As of this month, nearly 29% of adult city dwellers never have received a dose of COVID-19 vaccine, below collective immunity. “That’s why we want it to be a stronger federal mandate,” she said, not just local.

The health club industry has also expressed support for the city’s policy as a way to get back to normal. A spokesperson for fitness channel Crunch said its clubs would “work on the operational elements of this requirement” over the next week and provide members with “additional details.” She did not say how immunization information will be stored or collected.

“We know that vaccines are an essential tool against COVID-19 and in getting us out of this pandemic,” added Helen Durkin, executive vice president of public policy for the International Health, Racquet and Sportsclub Association. “Exercise too. “

Beth Fertig is a senior reporter covering the city’s recovery efforts at WNYC. You can follow her on Twitter at @bethfertig.



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A technological evolution: the saving grace for the restaurant industry

Belgioioso January 2021 728 × 90

Article written by Michael Schatzberg

The demand for digital automation in restaurants continues to skyrocket as the hospitality industry navigates a return to normalcy with more reliance on reducing costs, maximizing employee performance and retaining customers.

More … than 80% of business leaders accelerate the digitization plans of their work processes using new technologies, according to data from the The World Economic Forum published last fall. What else, 50% of employers should in fact automate more roles in businesses, especially restaurants.

This is because restaurant automation occurs with point-of-sale integrations, applications that enable remote management, and bespoke beverage delivery services, among other innovations in food technology. And savvy startups targeting these market niches are already one step ahead.

FOOD AND BEVERAGE AUTOMATION

Food technology innovations have fueled restaurants and big tech in recent weeks. Amazon introduced a palm-of-your-hand payment service at a Seattle Whole Foods. Domino’s announced its driverless pizza deliveries through a partnership with robotics company Nuro. And, on the food and beverage front, the New York-based online beer platform TapRm earlier this year, we tested a stand-alone beer service using robots that can carry up to 36 beers (up to 50 pounds).

TapRm continues to capitalize on its business model by working with brewers to achieve some of the most unique hard brews, ciders and seltts by distributing them to supermarkets and restaurants and also making them available direct to the consumer for delivery. The goal of these automated efforts is to reduce delivery costs and keep consumers safe by emphasizing contactless interactions.

War March 2021 728 × 90

Employee management in restaurants has also become more automated, especially at a time when many owners struggle to rehire employees and need to streamline their efficiency. Blanket helps automate day-to-day operations – from food safety to repairs, maintenance and planning, allowing managers to manage and solicit employee feedback remotely as needed.

DIGITAL ORDER BY HOME

Even as restaurants reopen for full service and capacity, many continue to operate offsite dining models. And while third-party delivery services like DoorDash and UberEats have seen extreme growth during the pandemic, new technology that allows a restaurant to build its own food delivery or ordering platform while helping it avoid marketing commission fees are growing in popularity. Channels like JuicePress rely on startups like GoParrot, which creates digital ordering platforms for restaurants so customers can buy food, personalize their orders, and get dish recommendations based on previous orders, all in one place.

GoParrot has helped Juice Press and other food business customers pivot their digital operations during the pandemic to enable the purchase of groceries and drinks online through its app.

DIGITAL REWARDS FOR ORDERING INCENTIVE

After more than a year of restaurants without seeing many of their customers in person, with a slight increase in delivery and take-out options, loyalty programs are a major way for operators to win back customers.

LuckyDiem, a marketplace that offers cash back rewards to over 200 million users, serves as an advertising platform for businesses that only pay for the service when customers purchase a meal at their restaurant, an incentive for the customer and operator. The platform promises to increase the number of new customer visits by over 50 each month and increase check size by over 30%.

Other loyal startups like Spend create personalized loyalty programs that include point systems for rewards, payment options with points and other incentives. The startup is also integrating with point-of-sale systems to help optimize customer service through things like table-top ordering and contactless payments.


Michel schatzbergMichael “Schatzy” Schatzberg is the co-founder and managing partner of Branded strategic hospitality and the general manager of branded restaurants. He has over 35 years of experience in marketing, brand development, management, business development and hospitality. Schatzberg began working at Duke’s in 1995. He then transformed a one-concept restaurant into a multi-unit hotel group – opening a second Duke’s location in Manhattan and renaming Big Daddy’s from a 1969 soda store into a variation of the classic American dinner. Schatzberg has developed, developed and managed 6 hospitality concepts and advises over 22 restaurants in New York. He is a founding member of the NYC Hospitality Alliance and a member of the New York State Restaurant Association.

After being one of the first to adopt hospitality technology as part of his concepts and having served as an advisor for many HI-Tech start-ups, Schatzberg founded Branded Strategic Hospitality, an investment and consultancy firm, which leverages its ecosystem of places of hospitality, expertise and relationships to influence, redefine and develop hotel technology (“HI-Tech”) and innovation in food and beverages. To date, the company has made 21 direct investments.


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NRAI aims to vaccinate 20,000 employees in the restaurant industry

NEW DELHI: The National Restaurant Association of India (NRAI) industry body said on Thursday it was working with its member restaurants to ensure 100% vaccination for the more than 20,000 employees working with them.

In recent months, major alcohol companies have also partnered with the NRAI to vaccinate restaurant industry workers. Companies such as Beam Suntory India, Diageo India, Pernod Ricard India and United Breweries Ltd have stepped up their efforts.

Sales through bars and restaurants contribute significantly to the revenues of liquor companies. Accordingly, the timely opening of restaurants is crucial for both the restaurant market and the alcoholic beverage industry.

Through this initiative, NRAI aims to vaccinate 20,000 “restaurant warriors” in member establishments across the country. “As cities begin to reopen, the safety and well-being of employees and guests is of the utmost importance to us,” the association said in a note Thursday.

NRAI runs vaccination camps in cities like Delhi NCR, Mumbai, Kolkata, Ludhiana, Jaipur, Bengaluru, Hyderabad, Pune, Chennai and Goa.

The restaurant industry has had a turbulent year as waves of covid rock the restaurant market. Even as markets open, the urgency to promote vaccination is visible.

“Vaccinating our employees is essential to achieve standardization and therefore we have launched this initiative,” said Anurag Katriar, President of NRAI. “The contribution of our business partners will help us immunize thousands of restaurant workers at our member locations nationwide. This initiative will help them return to work faster and without fear, creating a safe environment for our clients, ”said Katriar.

As the backbone of the industry, their health and safety is essential, making vaccination the need of the hour, said Neeraj Kumar, Managing Director of Beam Suntory India.

Diageo India, as part of its Raising the Bar program, has already announced several initiatives for the hospitality industry.

“The Indian food and beverage industry experienced unprecedented challenges during the pandemic, which severely affected our communities. As the industry opens its doors, our goal is to support the community through our “Raising the Bar” program so that their business and their jobs can come alive, ”said Shweta Jain, vice president of trade. luxury, major accounts India and South Asia, Diageo India.

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